Farmer overlooks drought-ravaged farm

Seeking Expressions of Interest for the role of Programme Leader, Impacts and Implications

We’re currently seeking applications for the role of Programme Leader, Impacts and Implications for the Deep South National Science Challenge.
 

Suzi Kerr at the Deep South Symposium 2017

Farewell to Dr Suzi Kerr, Science Lead of our Impacts and Implications Programme

It's with sadness we announce Dr Suzi Kerr's decision to step down from her role as Science Lead of our Impacts and Implications programme. Suzi developed this ground-breaking research programme, and we now have 14 climate impacts and adaptation research projects underway.

Whanau feed earthquake victims at Takahanga Marae

Coping in the face of climate change: Research announced to better support our communities

A new report released by the the Deep South National Science Challenge, Communities and climate change: Vulnerability to rising seas and more frequent flooding, highlights key gaps in our collective understanding about how climate change will impact Aotearoa New Zealand’s diverse communities.

The Wharewaka on Wellington's waterfront

Deep South Challenge symposium created opportunities for researchers to hear directly from end-users 

Remember our September symposium at Te Wharewaka ō Pōneke? Well, results are in from the surveys of participants we carried out to find out how well our aims for the symposium had been met.

Wendy Saunders

“Never wrestle with a pig”

An interview with our new Science Lead in the Engagement Programme, GNS social scientist Wendy Saunders

Flood map for South Dunedin under climate change

Creating a climate-safe Dunedin through community-driven climate action

2018 may well be the year New Zealand gets serious about adapting to our changing climate. Last year, and the start of this one, gave all of us plenty of opportunities to experience a future in which creeping sea level rise and extreme weather – from drought to flood to surprise storm surges – make day-to-day life more precarious and more expensive.

stormwater pipe

Stormwater, wastewater and climate change: Impacts on our economy, environment, culture and society

In October 2017, the Deep South Challenge released a report into the state of the nation’s storm and waste water infrastructure, in the face of a changing climate. The report garnered significant media attention – not surprising given the infrastructure is currently valued at well over $20 billion.

Omaio whanau

The Deep South Challenge awards funding to investigate climate-resilient, high-value crops for the whānau of Omaio

The whānau of Omaio in the Bay of Plenty have joined forces with NIWA researchers to explore the viability of climate-resilient, high-value crops for the rohe. The group has won a $250,000 research grant under the Vision Mātauranga programme of the Deep South National Science Challenge to better understand Omaio’s changing climate and how it might support the community to create a local economy based around a high-value product like kiwi fruit.

water tunnel

New Zealand's water systems particularly vulnerable to climate change

The recent Edgecumbe floods saw raw sewage floating through the streets, making the clean-up extremely challenging. Over 300 homes in the district were damaged and six months later, 240 houses are still unliveable. Flood-proofing the town itself remains a distant goal.

Yellow canary

Insurance: the canary in the coalmine of climate change?

The Deep South Challenge announces new research into who should bear the cost of our changing climate, and when.

All over New Zealand, from Haumoana to Westport, from Edgecumbe to the Kāpiti Coast, from Dunedin to Wellington City, homeowners and businesses are starting to feel the financial effects of climate change.