New methods to simulate Southern Ocean clouds

Southern ocean beneath grey skies

Climate model evaluation using satellite simulators: A like for like methodology

Modelling clouds and their influence is a significant challenge. Most cloud processes happen at scales far smaller than can be simulated by a climate model such as the NZ Earth System
Model (NZESM).

  • Project Duration: 1 year -1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017
  • Project Budget: $149,800

This project will expand on two existing Deep South Challenge projects, focussing on the evaluation and improvement of the NZESM with specific reference to clouds in the Southern Ocean.

This project will couple a satellite simulator (which replicates what a satellite would “see” of a given cloud distribution) to the NZESM and will apply advanced data analysis to the results, to assess satellite measurements of different kinds of clouds. The information produced will help us understand how the NZESM may be misrepresenting clouds, and will help improve the representation of clouds in
the model.

Contact Principal Investigator

Assoc. Prof. Adrian McDonald, University of Canterbury, adrian.mcdonald@canterbury.ac.nz

 

Other Earth System Modelling and Prediction projects:

Latest news and updates

Insurance: the canary in the coalmine of climate change?

The Deep South Challenge announces new research into who should bear the cost of our changing climate, and when.

All over New Zealand, from Haumoana to Westport, from Edgecumbe to the Kāpiti Coast, from Dunedin to Wellington City, homeowners and businesses are starting to feel the financial effects of climate change.

“Gaining traction on intractable issues”: An interview with Partnerships Director Susan Livengood

Susan Livengood is the Partnerships Director of the Deep South Challenge, and works within the Engagement programme – which tries to connect what’s happening in every programme of the challenge with both the broader public and with targeted individuals and organisations throughout New Zealand’s public and private sectors.