4D drones to measure Antarctic clouds, snow & ice

Sleds shrouded in Antarctic fog

Versatile 4D drones for observations of key deep south earth system processes

We have large gaps in our observational data about sea ice, clouds and snow in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica, which
effects the quality of our climate models.

  • Project Duration: 1 year
  • Project Budget: $299,000

The challenging polar environment restricts our ability to gather data effectively, particularly about the thickness of sea ice and the distribution of aerosols, which are critical to cloud formation. We need better tools for observing these systems that function well in a tough environment.

In this project, we’re developing and testing the use of drones to gather and validate data, including satellite data. Drones can be deployed from sea ice or ships and can cover a large area quickly – a big advantage. The application of smart technologies means we can contribute to data gathering by other
Deep South Challenge projects.

Contact Principle Investigator

Dr Wolfgang Rack, University of Canterbury, Gateway Antarctica, Email:  wolfgang.rack@canterbury.ac.nz

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